PRINT ISN’T DEAD. THERE I SAID IT.

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Enough already, print media isn’t dead, it’s just moved. Or morphed. Or found a seat along the bench.

When TV emerged into the media landscape in the 1950s, radio was dead. TV will kill radio. It will raise its giant antenna and smash the crap out of it. It will be a gruesome death.

Funny … anyone listen to the radio today? I know I did … CBC, on the way to work. Seems as though it didn’t die.

It’s like arguing that cars should be dead as more motorbikes are on the road than ever. Holy smokes, what about hover boards? Vespas? Those are surely going to destroy cars. Cars are dead.

... silly argument. 

There are statistics to support either side of the annoying debate and we all know that liars sure can figure and figures sure can lie. So I’m not about to showcase numbers or statistics to support either side.

If the conversation shifted to what print can do and how it can compliment a wider family of media, we can all save each other the headache. 

Social, digital, TV, radio, podcasts. The more the merrier … more choices for the consumer. And they all have their place and their own merits for certain content distribution.

When Bill Gates published the article ‘Content is King’ in 1996, as a rallying cry for Microsoft to get their talons into the emerging Internet consumer … a medium that he said can disseminate information “worldwide at basically zero marginal cost to the publisher.”

True Bill. 

But my suggestion, based on over a decade of producing content on every possible platform, is that Content is King (did Bill coin this phrase? Nice work again Bill) but it is referring to good content. Consumers want quality content, if it’s crap then it doesn’t matter what form of physical material, ether or radio waves that it is generated in, people will not read it, watch it or listen to it. Or, more to the point, consume it.

I'm not suggesting a Kumbaya group hug here, competition between all forms of media will keep everyone on their toes. But there's certainly a place for all of them. And print is certainly still at the table.